Concussion in Youth Sports – Addressing Recovery NATURALLY

by Court Vreeland, DC, DACNB

Concussion, or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), is a growing concern in sports but particularly in youth sports. A concussion is defined as a reaction by the brain to a jolt or force that can be transmitted to the head by an impact or blow occurring anywhere on the body. Essentially, a concussion results from the brain moving back and forth or twisting rapidly inside the skull.1 Although the hallmark of concussion is classically considered loss of consciousness, most occur without such an event.

Each year, at least 1.7 million TBIs occur either as an isolated injury or along with other injuries and about 75% of those are concussions or other forms of mild TBI. Children are the most at risk group to sustain a concussion with nearly a half million emergency department visits each year for TBI in children aged 0 to 14 years.2

Children present a unique problem when evaluating for return to play and monitoring recovery. While children are often thought of as more resilient when it comes to health, there is evidence they actually take longer to recover from concussion.3 Additionally, the brain of a child is still developing. Differing maturation rates makes mTBI important to understand. Patient age and maturation may affect prognosis.4

The biologic response to concussion by the brain is defined by an energy crisis and a neuroinflammatory response. The most immediate response by the brain is a large increase in demand for energy in the form of glucose. However, this is coupled with a decrease in cerebral blood flow. This creates a paradox in which the demand for energy far exceeds the brain’s ability to supply it. As a result, a complex set of interactions is triggered eventually resulting in severe neuronal dysfunction or death.5 The neuroinflammatory response is characterized by changes in the integrity of the blood brain barrier and immune system activation. This immune activation is from both the peripheral immune system and the immune system in the brain. It is mediated by inflammatory molecules called cytokines.6

The goal of treatment initially should be rest and removal from activity. The length of time this will last depends on the severity of the injury. Additionally, every attempt should be made to supply the brain with as much fuel as possible. The child should be eating frequently and not skipping meals. Meals should consist of low glycemic fruits, vegetables and high quality protein and fat.

After the initial phase has passed, control of the neuroinflammatory response and repair of the blood brain barrier should begin. This may include supplementing with products like superoxide dismutase, lipoic acid, vitamin D, N-acetyl cysteine, or omega-3 fatty acids. The goal of these is to reduce inflammation and balance pro-inflammatory cytokine production with anti-inflammatory cytokine production. The above with also have a favorable impact on blood brain barrier integrity.

References:

  1. http://www.nysphsaa.org/safety/pdf/NYSED%20Guidelines%20for%20Concussion%20Management.pdf
  2. http://www.cdc.gov/traumaticbraininjury/statistics.html
  3. McCrory P, Meeuwisse W, Johnston K, Dvorak J, Aubry M, Molloy M, Cantu R. Consensus statement on concussion in sport–the 3rd International Conference on concussion in sport, held in Zurich, November 2008. J Clin Neurosci. 2009 Jun;16(6):755-63.
  4. Toledo E, Lebel A, Becerra L, Minster A, Linnman C, Maleki N, Dodick DW, Borsook D. The young brain and concussion: imaging as a biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis. Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2012 Jul;36(6):1510-31.
  5. Giza CC, Hovda DA. The Neurometabolic Cascade of Concussion. J Athl Train. 2001 Sep;36(3):228-235.
  6. Das M, Mohapatra S, Mohapatra SS. New perspectives on central and peripheral immune responses to acute traumatic brain injury. J Neuroinflammation. 2012 Oct 12;9:236.

Court Vreeland, DC, DACNB

Dr. Court Vreeland completed his undergraduate work at Fairleigh Dickison University in Madison, New Jersey where he received a Bachelor of Science degree in biology with a minor in chemistry. He then attended Logan College of Chiropractic in St. Louis, Missouri where he completed his Doctor of Chiropractic Degree. Dr. Vreeland finished his Diplomate degree in chiropractic neurology in September of 2007. He has also completed courses in the Neurological Rehabilitation of ADHD and Other Learning Disabilities and in Vestibular Rehabilitation. Additionally, Dr. Vreeland has completed 100 hours of training in Applied Kinesiology and lectures regularly throughout the community and New England. He has lectured for continuing education credits for the Vermont Chiropractic Association as well as regularly holding seminars for manual therapists in New England.

 

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Supplement FAQ: DopaTropic® Powder

by Biotics Research

Why you may need DopaTropic® Powder:

Vastly complex, the human nervous system coordinates innumerable processes via a host of chemical messengers called neurotransmitters.  Neurotransmitters are used for everything from signaling the heart and lungs to function, to enabling the body to sleep so regeneration and repair can occur.  Emotions, affect, mood, appetite, and even energy levels are also regulated by neurotransmitters.  Unfortunately, neurotransmitters operate within a very narrow confine, and their balance can be easily disrupted by a variety of factors including genetics, immune function, diet, stress, and general chemical toxicity.  Dopamine is an excitatory neurotransmitter that is important for regulating physical movement, emotion, and pleasure and motivation centers of the brain.  It also plays a neurocognitive role, particularly with memory, problem  solving, motivation, learning, and the ability to focus.  Additionally, dopamine acts on the sympathetic nervous system, thus it impacts physiological functions such as heart rate, blood pressure, and libido.

Why your healthcare practitioner recommends DopaTropic® Powder from Biotics Research:

DopaTropic® Powder is one of the newest additions to the Biotics Research line of fine nutritional supplements and is part of the NeuTropic™ triad of products (PheniTropic™NeuPerzine®, and DopaTropic® Powder).  L-Dopa, (aka levodopa; L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) is a naturally occurring dopamine precursor that is derived from the Mucuna pruriens plant.  L-Dopa is an amino acid which is converted to the catecholamine neurotransmitter dopamine.  Low levels of dopamine are found in Parkinsons patients, and are associated with addictions, cravings, difficulty with focusing, or with the intake or processing information.  Each level teaspoon of DopaTropic® Powder contains 125 mg of L-Dopa that is sweetened with erythritol for fast delivery and ease of use.  Erythritol is a natural sugar alcohol that is 60-70% as sweet as sugar, yet it is almost non-caloric, and does not affect blood sugar levels or promote tooth decay.  Unlike other sugar alcohols, it is unlikely to cause gastric side effects.  It is usually recommended that DopaTropic® Powder be dosed early in the day as it may elicit sleep disturbances if taken before bed.  DopaTropic® Powder is not recommended for use during pregnancy or lactation.  Nor should it be taken in conjunction with MAOI’s, psychosis medications, blood thinners, diabetic medications, or by patients taking medications for Parkinsons disease.

 

Click here to download the Patient FAQ on DopaTropic® Powder from Biotics Research in a printable PDF.

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Obsessions and Compulsions

by Rachel Olivier, MS, ND, PhD

Anxiety disorders affect as many as eighteen percent (18%) of Americans.  Of these, mental disorders account for four out of the ten leading causes of disability in the US and other developed countries.1  While generalized anxiety disorder is the most common anxiety disorder that affects older adults,2 other disorders including obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder and social anxiety disorder are also common.

OCD is thought to affect between 2-3% of the general population, and is the fourth most common psychiatric illness.3  In obsessive compulsive disorder people become trapped in “endless cycles of repetitive thoughts and behaviors”4, which can cause distress and anxiousness.  Because of this, the disease can become potentially disabling.  Although many of these patients are prescribed serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), it is estimated that 40-60% of patients do not respond adequately to this type of therapy.5, 6, 7

B-vitamins, particularly vitamin B6 can be very beneficial in the management of anxiety.  Vitamin B6 is important in the synthesis of the neurotransmitters γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine and epinephrine.  Messenger molecules or neuropeptides are thought to link the immune, endocrine and central nervous system.  These messenger molecules are transmitted through virtually all bodily fluids.  Additionally, vitamin B6 plays an important role as a “physiological mediator of steroid hormone function.”8  For individuals requiring vitamin B6, B6 Phosphate may be a beneficial addition to the daily diet.  Each tablet supplies 20mg of vitamin B6 as pyridoxal-5-phosphate.

Inositol can also be of benefit in OCD, as it functions in the maintenance of suitable electrical energy and nutrient transfer across cell membranes, thus it facilitates nerve impulses.  Intracellularly it acts as a second-messenger, and aides in the regulation of a number of cellular functions, and it can assist in elevating serotonin levels.  Additionally, it also acts as a lipotropic agent, converting fats into other useful products.

Other minerals such as methonine, calcium, magnesium, and zinc can also be beneficial for OCD patients, and patients with other anxiety disorders.  Methionine-200™ supplies 200mg of methionine per capsule, while Multi-Mins™ provides a source of Ca, Mg, Zn and other essential minerals.

  1. Lakhan SE, Vieira KF. Nutritional therapies for mental disorders. Nutritional J. 2008 7(2):1-8.
  2. Calleo J, Stanley M (2008).  Anxiety Disorders in Later Life: Differentiated Diagnosis and Treatment Strategies.  Psychiatric Times. 2008 26 (8).
  3. Bloch MH, Landeros-Weisenberger A, Kelmendi B, Coric V, Bracken MB, Leckman JF. A systemic review: antipsychotic augmentation with treatment refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder. Molecular Psychiatry. 2006 11:622-632.
  4.  www.webmd.com/anxiety-panic/guide/obsessive-compulsive-disorder
  5. Alarcon RD, Libb JW, Spitler D. A predictive study of obsessive-compulsive disorder response to clomipramine. J Clin Psychopharmacol. 1993 Jun 13(3):210-3.
  6. Erzegovesi S, Cavallini MC, Cavedini P, Diaferia G, Locatelli M, Bellodi L. Clinical predictors of drug response in obsessive-compulsive disorder. J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2001 Oct 21(5):488-92.
  7. Ravizza L, Barzega G; Bellino S; Bogetto F; Maina, G. Predictors of drug treatment response in obsessive-compulsive disorder. J Clin Psychiatry. 1995 56(8): 368-373.
  8. Berdanier C. Advanced Nutrition. Micronutrients. CRC Press. 1998. pp.103.

Rachel Olivier, MS, ND, PhD

Dr. Rachel Olivier serves as a Physician Advisor for Biotics Research Corporation, a position she has held for over eleven years. As a Physician Advisor she serves to both educate and provide professional leadership for physicians and practitioners, in an effort to improve product understanding. In this capacity she serves as the main consultant, advisor and technical expert for health care practitioners. She also prepares and executes training seminars, and provides training and product support material for practitioners and members of the sales team, as well as writes technical and scientifically oriented papers for journals and trade magazines, and product literature updates. She holds a Masters degree in Molecular Biology from University of Southwestern Louisiana (currently the University of LA), along with a traditional Naturopathic Degree from Honolulu University, and a PhD in nutrition from California University.  She can be contacted at 800-231-5777 or via the website at www.bioticsresearch.com.

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Supplement FAQ: Neuro-5-HTP Plus™

by Biotics Research

Why you may need Neuro-5-HTP Plus™:

Stressful or fast-paced lifestyles, compounded by the grossly inferior Standard American Diet (SAD) have resulted in widespread neurotransmitter imbalances which may often manifest as altered mood, sleep disturbances, carbohydrate cravings or weight gain, focal or diffuse muscle pain, and headaches. Tryptophan assimilated into the body is metabolized to the amino acid 5-Hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) which is the precursor to the synthesis of 5-hydroxytryptamine, which along with dopamine and norepinephrine, are the three main monoamine neurotransmitters. Commonly referred to as the “feel good” neurotransmitter, it has been established that higher serotonin levels reduce carbohydrate cravings and hunger levels in general. In several weight loss studies it was noted that participants with 5-HTP supplementation were afforded weight loss in excess of one pound per week with almost total elimination of the irritability and excess hunger that can plague dieters. Serotonin levels should be a consideration for those with depression, obesity, carbohydrate sensitivity, fibromyalgia, ADHD, migraine headaches, and insomnia.

Why your healthcare practitioner recommends Neuro-5-HTP Plus™ from Biotics Research:

Neuro-5-HTP Plus™ combines 5-HTP along with 10 mg of B6 phosphate, 50 mg of niacinamide and 50 mg of the neurologically active amino acid L-theanine. These additional ingredients are present to facilitate the conversion of 5-HTP to serotonin with L-theanine increasing alpha waves in the brain and impacting serotonin and/or dopamine neurotransmitters related to memory and learning. The most commonly reported side effect experienced with 5-HTP is nausea, and this can be avoided by initially using a lesser amount and slowly working up to the dose required. Additionally, 5-HTP is not recommended for use during pregnancy or lactation, and should be avoided by patients with cardiovascular disease or those taking certain medications including MAO inhibitors, SSRIs and other serotonergic drugs. Once again, Biotics Research Corporation brings you “The Best of Science & Nature”.

 

Click here to download the Patient FAQ on Neuro-5-HTP Plus™  from Biotics Research in a printable PDF.

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The Gut-Brain Connection

by Court Vreeland, DC, DACNB

A large body of evidence is accumulating to support a role between healthy gut function, brain development and function of the central nervous system. The organisms contained in the gut should be considered an inner organ with functions similar in importance to any other organ present in the body. Disruptions in this “organ” may alter many things including brain function and cause symptoms like depression, anxiety, ‘brain fog’ and more.

At birth the human gastrointestinal tract is sterile, however, it is quickly colonized and by the age of one year, the bacterial profile looks similar to that of an adult.1 The connection between the gut and the brain is known to be bidirectional. This means messages from the gut affect brain function just as much as messages from the brain affect gut function.2

The mechanism by which alterations in bacterial profiles of the gut affect how we feel, think and move is fascinating. It all begins with lipopolysaccharides (LPS). LPS are structures located on the surfaces of bacteria present in our gut. These LPS may actually get out of the gut and into the blood stream producing a very strong immune response. Normally, the gut does a very good job keeping these LPS from getting into the blood stream.3 However, when the barrier in the gut weakens (‘leaky gut’) LPS is more easily absorbed and enters circulation.  When this occurs, inflammation ensues. If the process continues, high levels of inflammation are generated and this begins to alter neurotransmitter levels in the brain. With enough change in neurotransmitter levels, mood, behavior and cognitive function suffer.

What causes leaky gut? There are a lot of factors, however, evidence points to a high fructose diet (sugary beverages), the Western diet (high in processed foods) and nutrient deficiencies like vitamin D, A, zinc and magnesium.These factors are also known to increase the ability of LPS to get into the blood stream.4

Symptoms of depression, anxiety, ‘brain fog,’ or poor memory may not always be coming from your brain. The genesis of the problem might actually be in your gut! By maintaining a healthy diet and addressing potential nutrient deficiencies you may see many of your symptoms disappear without the need to expensive, mind-altering medications!

References:
1Palmer C, Bik EM, DiGiulio DB, Relman DA, Brown PO. Development of the human infant intestinal microbiota. PLoS Biol. 2007 Jul;5(7):e177.
2O’Mahony SM, Hyland NP, Dinan TG, Cryan JF. Maternal separation as a model of brain-gut axis dysfunction. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2011 Mar;214(1):71-88.
3Bested AC, Logan AC, Selhub EM. Intestinal microbiota, probiotics and mental health: from Metchnikoff to modern advances: Part II – contemporary contextual research. Gut Pathog. 2013 Mar 14;5(1):3.
4Teixeira TF, Collado MC, Ferreira CL, Bressan J, Peluzio Mdo C. Potential mechanisms for the emerging link between obesity and increased intestinal permeability. Nutr Res. 2012 Sep;32(9):637-47.


Court Vreeland, DC, DACNB

Dr. Court Vreeland completed his undergraduate work at Fairleigh Dickison University in Madison, New Jersey where he received a Bachelor of Science degree in biology with a minor in chemistry. He then attended Logan College of Chiropractic in St. Louis, Missouri where he completed his Doctor of Chiropractic Degree. Dr. Vreeland finished his Diplomate degree in chiropractic neurology in September of 2007. He has also completed courses in the Neurological Rehabilitation of ADHD and Other Learning Disabilities and in Vestibular Rehabilitation. Additionally, Dr. Vreeland has completed 100 hours of training in Applied Kinesiology and lectures regularly throughout the community and New England. He has lectured for continuing education credits for the Vermont Chiropractic Association as well as regularly holding seminars for manual therapists in New England.

 

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Common Threads between Diabetes and Neurological Disorders

by Dennis McInerney, BS

A March 2011 article in the British Journal of Pharmacology suggests a possible link between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The evidence for a connection between T2DM and AD is based upon a variety of diverse studies. The article presents the parallel effects of impaired insulin signaling has on T2DM and AD.1

T2DM is caused by insulin resistance in peripheral tissues. Characteristic features of diabetes mellitus syndromes include impairments in insulin actions and signaling that result in chronic hyperglycemia, irrespective of subtype, etiology, pathogenesis, or insulin availability.2 Abnormal insulin processing, insulin receptor defects and/or post-receptor defects can lead to CNS problems, including AD, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, malignancies, migraine headaches, and schizophrenia.2

Studies also suggest that insulin resistance plays a role in the pathophysiology and clinical symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease in patients who are not diabetic. It has long been known that insulin is essential for energy metabolism in the periphery. Convergent findings demonstrate that insulin also plays a role in energy metabolism and other aspects of CNS function. Insulin and insulin receptors are densely but selectively expressed in the brain, including the medial temporal regions that support the formation of memory. It has been demonstrated that insulin-sensitive glucose transporters are localized to the same regions supporting memory and that insulin plays a role in memory functions. Collectively, these findings suggest that insulin may contribute to normal cognitive functioning and that insulin abnormalities may exacerbate cognitive impairments, such as those associated with Alzheimer’s disease.The term “type 3 diabetes” has been used to reflect the fact that AD represents a form of diabetes that selectively involves the brain and has molecular and biochemical features that overlap with T2DM.2 The increased occurrence of insulin resistance in Alzheimer’s disease and the numerous mechanisms through which insulin may affect clinical and pathological aspects of the disease suggest that improving insulin effectiveness may have therapeutic benefit for patients with Alzheimer’s disease.3

Another group of player in T2DM and AD are advanced glycation end-products (AGE’s) that are derived from the bonding of a protein or lipid molecule with a sugar molecule, such as fructose or glucose, without the controlling action of an enzyme. In T2DM, AGE’s can cause retinopathy, neuropathy, cataracts, etc.  In AD brains, AGE-2 is mainly present in the cytosol of neurons in the hippocampus and para-hippocampal gyrus. Protein cross-linking by AGE structures results in the formation of protease-resistant aggregates. Such protein aggregates may interfere with both axonal transport and intracellular protein traffic in neuron.”4

The major underlying cause for both insulin resistance and the production of AGE’s is excess carbohydrate consumption. If you want to minimize your risk for T2Dm and AD, consider a whole food diet like the Paleo-Mediterranean Diet. Also consider supplementing with nutrients that support carbohydrate metabolism like Bio-Glycozyme Forte™ or GlucoBalance® from Biotics Research Corporation.

References

  1. Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2011 March; 71(3): 365–376. Diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer’s disease: shared pathology and treatment? Kawser Akter, Emily A Lanza, Stephen A Martin, Natalie Myronyuk, Melanie Rua, and Robert B Raffa http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3045545/?tool=pmcentrez&rendertype=abstract
  2.  J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2008 November; 2(6): 1101–1113. Published online 2008 November. Alzheimer’s Disease Is Type 3 Diabetes–Evidence Reviewed. Suzanne M. de la Monte, M.D., M.P.H. and Jack R. Wands, M.D. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2769828/
  3. CNS Drugs. 2003;17(1):27-45. The role of insulin resistance in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease: implications for treatment. Watson GS, Craft S http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12467491
  4. Curr Alzheimer Res. 2004 Feb;1(1):39-46. Involvement of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) in Alzheimer’s disease. Takeuchi M, Kikuchi S, Sasaki N, Suzuki T, Watai T, Iwaki M, Bucala R, Yamagishi S. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15975084

Dennis McInerney, BS

Dennis McInerney has been the Southeast operations manager for Biotics Research Corporation since 1996. He is a graduate of Moravian College with a B.S. in Biology and Chemistry. He has over 45 years of experience in the health care field. His in-depth knowledge of biochemistry, physiology, pharmacology and how it pertains to nutritional supplementation has earned the respect as a highly regarded speaker and metabolic consultant by health care professionals of all disciplines. His experience includes several years as a research pharmacologist as well as a metabolic consultant. In 1998, Dennis founded the Health Resource Center, an educational company, dedicated to helping health care professionals understand and reverse the detrimental effects of the modern diet. Through seminars and workshops, the Health Resource Center provides functional nutritional information and the clinical tools necessary to successfully guide patients on a path to nutritional wellness.

 

 

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Supplement FAQ: NeuPerzine®

by Biotics Research

Why you may need NeuPerzine®:

Vastly complex, the human nervous system coordinates innumerable processes via, a host of chemical messengers called neurotransmitters. Neurotransmitters are used for everything from signaling the heart and lungs to function, to enabling the body to sleep so regeneration and repair can occur. Emotions, affect, mood, appetite, and even energy levels are also regulated by neurotransmitters. Unfortunately, neurotransmitters operate within a very narrow confine, and their balance can be easily disrupted by a variety of factors including genetics, immune function, diet, stress, and general chemical toxicity. NeuPerzine® contains huperzine A, a powerful acetylcholinesterase inhibitor which makes acetylcholine more readily available in the brain, and according to published research, can enhance memory.

Why your healthcare practitioner recommends NeuPerzine™ from Biotics Research:

When healthcare practitioners have determined that a patients’ neurotransmitters are imbalanced, they may choose to address it in a variety of ways including diet, exercise, and strategic supplementation. NeuPerzine® contains a natural compound extracted from the Huperzia serrata plant. This natural compound has been shown to enhance memory in students1, while pharmaceutical derivatives of this natural compound are currently under study for the treatment of Alzheimers2. In fact, huperzine A compares favorably to synthetic acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in use with the additional benefit of being an antioxidant and neuroprotective. It has been found to be protective against beta amyloid-mediated oxidative stress and apoptosis. It supports general cognition, global clinical status, behavioral disturbance and functional performance. Once again, Biotics Research brings to you supplements representing “The Best of Science & Nature”.

1. Sun, QQ; Xu, SS; Pan, JL; Guo, HM; Cao, WQ (1999). “Huperzine-A capsules enhance memory and learning performance in 34 pairs of matched adolescent students.”. Zhongguo yao li xue bao = Acta pharmacologica Sinica 20 (7): 601–3

2.Shulgina GI (1986). “On neurotransmitter mechanisms of reinforcement and internal inhibition”. Pavlov J Biol Sci 21 (4): 129–40

Click here to download the Patient FAQ on NeuPerzine®  from Biotics Research in a printable PDF.

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Supplement FAQ: PheniTropic™

by Biotics Research

Why you may need PheniTropic™:

The human nervous system is vastly complex as it coordinates innumerable processes via neurotransmitters. These chemical messengers are required for everything from signaling the heart and lungs to function, to enabling the body to sleep so regeneration and repair can occur. Emotions, affect, mood, appetite, and even energy levels are also regulated by neurotransmitters. Unfortunately, neurotransmitters operate within a very narrow confine, and their balance can be easily disrupted by a variety of factors including genetics, immune function, diet, stress, and general chemical exposure. Gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) is a primary inhibitory neurotransmitter. It is one of the ‘feel good’ neurotransmitters that also includes Serotonin, Dopamine, and Norepinehprine, and it is commonly referred to as the anti-anxiety neurotransmitter.

Why your healthcare practitioner recommends PheniTropic™ from Biotics Research:

Patients with low levels of GABA often complain of or present with hyperactivity, anxiety, irritability, altered mood, and sleep difficulties. PheniTropic™ contains beta-Phenyl-gamma-aminobutyric acid (Phenibut), a natural derivative of GABA. Phenibut has been demonstrated to have a calming effect and may assist in instances of stress, anxiety, and even the improvement of impaired sleep.1 However, due to its derivation of GABA, PheniTropic™ appears to have no significant negative side effects other than the potential for increased sleepiness in some individuals. These effects were not significant when compared with prescription sleep aids.2 PheniTropic™ should not be taken with alcohol, and it should not be used during pregnancy and/or lactation, or in conjunction with sedatives, MAOIs, sleep aids, or with anxiety or seizure medications.

1. Shulgina GI (1986). “On neurotransmitter mechanisms of reinforcement and internal inhibition”. Pavlov J Biol Sci 21 (4): 129–40

2. Lapin I (2001). “Phenibut (beta-phenyl-GABA): a tranquilizer and nootropic drug”. CNS Drug Rev 7 (4): 471–81)

 

Click here to download the Patient FAQ on PheniTropic™ from Biotics Research in a printable PDF.

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Supplement FAQ: Stamina Caps™

by Biotics Research

Why you may need Stamina Caps™:

Stamina is an excellent measure of fitness. In fact, many people assume that they are physically fit, and they may be able to adequately perform specific actions of strength, but a true measure of their fitness level lies in whether they have the physical endurance, the stamina – per say, to perform physical activity for prolonged periods of time without quickly faltering or tiring. Training can correct strength inadequacies relatively quickly, but it takes more to significantly increase the body’s endurance levels. A combination of dietary modification and targeted nutritional support can enhance conditioning training to increase the body’s endurance levels more rapidly and to a greater extent. Specific nutrients, in combination, can play a role in increasing endurance and promoting energy production, while also enhancing metabolism.

Why your healthcare practitioner recommends Stamina Caps™ from Biotics Research:

Stamina Caps™ are yet another unique product exclusive to Biotics Research. It has been specially formulated to support physical stamina and mitochondrial energy conversion. Stamina Caps™ contain a specific blend of  Thiamin, a metabolic cofactor. Decreased levels of thiamin have been associated with impaired immunity, muscle or nerve loss, and impaired metabolism of carbohydrates and branched-chain amino acids. Pantothenic Acid is required for mitochondrial energy production and is an essential part of the enzyme Coenzyme CoA, which is involved in the synthesis of essential fats, cholesterol, steroid hormones, and neurotransmitters. A deficiency of pantothenic acid is associated with fatigue, listlessness, insomnia, and altered mood. Coenzyme Q10 is mandatory for mitochondrial energy production. It is known to be cardioprotective, cytoprotective, and neuroprotective. CoQ10 is readily depleted during periods of stress or injury, and low levels of CoQ10 are almost always found in those with poor stamina. L-Carnitine is an amino acid that plays an essential role in carbohydrate metabolism. It is required for the transportation of fatty acids into the mitochondria for oxidation. L-Carnitine  deficiency is associated with mitochondrial energy deficit, fatigue, weakness, muscle spasm, and delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). OOrganik-15™ is included as it supplies methyl donors and acceptors which are necessary for the synthesis of creatine in the muscle – which has been shown to help maintain muscular ATP concentrations. Octacosanol (derived from rice-not wheat) is alsoprovided and has been demonstrated to improve reaction time to visual stimuli. This may not be important to a jogger, but could be very important to someone who plays competitive tennis, baseball or participates in martial arts. Stamina Caps™ is an excellent adjunct for patients who could benefit from improved endurance or improved cardiovascular fitness.

Click here to download the Patient FAQ on Stamina Caps™ from Biotics Research in a printable PDF.

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Athletic Nutrition

by Rachel Olivier, MS, ND, PhD

It is well recognized that specific nutrients, either solely or in combination, play a functional role in increasing endurance and promoting energy production, while also enhancing metabolism. Optimal nutrition is essential for peak performance. Of particular importance for sustained energy production are the B vitamins thiamin, riboflavin, and niacin. All three are utilized to produce energy from the fuel sources in the diet.[1] Vitamin B6, pantothenic acid, and biotin also function as co-enzymes in energy metabolism, thus are also an important component in any athletic nutritional program.

The sustained production of energy is necessary in any exercise regimen, as well as for the enhancement of athletic performance. The combination of minerals contained in the formula Stamina Caps™ may serve to increase both energy production and stamina. Included in this formula are the B-vitamins Thiamin and Pantothenic Acid, along with other components for energy support, such as L-Carnitine, Octacasanol, Coenzyme Q10 and Oorganik-15™.

Sweating during exercise increases the body’s loss of electrolytes, including sodium and potassium. Potassium-rich foods such as bananas, oranges, and potatoes eaten throughout training and after competition can serve to replenish necessary potassium. Likewise, in addition to sodium and potassium, heavy exercise also affects the body’s supply of iron and calcium. For certain individuals it may be necessary to supplement the diet with these minerals. Multi-Mins™ supplies these minerals, along with other essential minerals like zinc, chromium and selenium.

Similarly amino acids can also be beneficial in both an athletic program, and for overall health. In a trial with elite athletes, amino acids given during training for one month resulted in increased indices of blood oxygen-carrying capacity and decreased muscle damage.[2] Amino acids can also aide in improving the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood, including facilitating a quicker recovery from muscle fatigue that follows extreme exercise training. Amino Sport™ supplies a broad spectrum of amino acids including L-Glutamic acid, L-Phenylalanine, L-Leucine, L-Aspartic acid, Lysine, L-Ornithine, L-Arginine, L-Methionine, L-Threonine, L-Isoleucine, L-Proline, L-Valine, L-Alanine, L-Serine, L-Tyrosine, L-Cystine, Glycine, L-Histidine, L-Tryptophan, L-Asparagine, L-Citrulline. Likewise, liquid forms of amino acids can aide in correcting blood sugar dysregulation and hypoglycemia, as well as contribute to the electrolyte supply. Amino Acid Quick Sorb™ supplies branched-chain amino acids in a liquid form, which may play an important role in blood sugar stabilization, and recovery from fatigue. As a consequence of the oral ingestion of essential amino acids, an increased stimulation of protein synthesis occurs, evidenced by an increase in the level of plasma amino acids.[3]

Protein and fats also serve as important as fuel sources. Protein is required for muscle repair, while essential fatty acids play a functional role in the production and maintenance of hormones. Whey Protein Isolate supplies an excellent amino acid profile, and may be used to supplement the diet with added protein, which may be particularly important in a weight training program. Fat provides fuel for the body; use of fat as fuel depends on the duration of the exercise and the condition of the athlete. Both Optimal EFAs® and Biomega-3™, available in caps or liquid, provides a beneficial source of essential fatty acids. Finally, water is a critical nutrient for athletes, as dehydration can cause muscle cramping and fatigue.

[2] Ohtani M, Sugita M, Maruyama K. Amino acid mixture improves training efficiency in athletes. J. Nutr. February 2006. 136(2):538S-543S

[3] Paddon-Jones D, Sheffield-Moore M, Zhang XJ, Volpi E, Wolf SE, Aarsland A, Ferrando AA, Wolfe RR Amino acid ingestion improves muscle protein synthesis in the young and elderly. Am J Physiol (Endocrinol Metab) 2004 286:E321–E328.


Rachel Olivier, MS, ND, PhD

Dr. Rachel Olivier serves as a Physician Advisor for Biotics Research Corporation, a position she has held for over eleven years. As a Physician Advisor she serves to both educate and provide professional leadership for physicians and practitioners, in an effort to improve product understanding. In this capacity she serves as the main consultant, advisor and technical expert for health care practitioners. She also prepares and executes training seminars, and provides training and product support material for practitioners and members of the sales team, as well as writes technical and scientifically oriented papers for journals and trade magazines, and product literature updates. She holds a Masters degree in Molecular Biology from University of Southwestern Louisiana (currently the University of LA), along with a traditional Naturopathic Degree from Honolulu University, and a PhD in nutrition from California University.  She can be contacted at 800-231-5777 or via the website at www.bioticsresearch.com.

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Biotics Research Corporation has been a leading manufacturer of specially designed nutritional products for over thirty years. Our mission remains constant: to be the benchmark of excellence in nutritional science, technology and service, providing the clinician with reliable, innovative products of superior quality as well as the highest level of customer service.

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